Exhibitions

Artist’s Portfolio →

Gallery Location

501 East Dean Street (Residences at The Little Nell building)

Aspen, CO 81611

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CHAOS & CONTROL
March 7 – April 14, 2014
Reception for the artist, Friday, March 14, 6 – 8 pm

Known for intricately constructed and wildly colored oil-on-linen paintings, Brinker’s latest works continue his journey into a uniquely stylized fantasyland.

The new works, all square shaped and numbering about a dozen, range in size from 12-by-12 inches to 60-by-60 inches. If the individual works feel similar by turns, that’s by design, according to Brinker — he “samples”, to borrow the phrase from hip-hop artists, from his earlier work as well from found pieces of pop art, such as Trix cereal box covers.

A typical process for Brinker begins with an idea that is realized in a preliminary sketch. This concept for a painting is then further developed in an intricate collage. Brinker uses the computer to finalize the layers to be painted, and with a digital projector, lays out the image. As he works, the painting begins to develop on another level of revelation, which takes roughly four-to-six weeks of painting.

“My paintings are built, literally, that’s how I feel about it,” Brinker says during a recent tour of his West Buttermilk studio, one that he shares with his longtime partner, the artist Pamela Joseph. “I’m totally into process and that’s because of my printmaking background.”

Brinker continues, “I don’t always like to tell people I’m working on the computer, but that’s how I’m layering somewhere between two and six layers, fragmented in ways so that every painting has something from an earlier piece.”

Smiling, Brinker adds, “It’s not important that you know that, but it is part of my process — this combination of chaos and control.”
A native of Berwyn, Ill., a suburb of Chicago, Brinker moved to the Roaring Fork Valley in the early 1990s to help manage the print shop at the Anderson Ranch Arts Center in Snowmass Village. Now, Brinker’s work is represented in diverse collections around the world, including the National Art Museum of China, in Beijing, the New York Public Library, Progressive Insurance, Albright–Knox Art Gallery, and Lavazza Coffee, in Turin, Italy.

“I’m always trying to create a challenge for myself,” says Brinker. “How am I going to make this? I mean, I can make it as a collage, but how do I possibly make it with colors and paint and all the layers? It’s almost like an architectural challenge.”

The answer, it seems, comes back to printmaking.

“I liked making prints, but I also thought it was horrible in a way. Still, without my background in printmaking, I don’t think I’d be the painter that I am today.”

Artist’s Portfolio →

Gallery Location

501 East Dean Street (Residences at The Little Nell building)

Aspen, CO 81611

Map/Directions →

MOUNTAIN, WOODS, WATER
January 31 – March 5, 2014
Reception for the artist, Friday, March 5, 6 – 8 pm

Known for sweeping large-format acrylic-on-canvas landscape works — representational and abstract both, strong and subtle — Warner’s work purposefully challenges a range of emotion and interpretations.

“I struggle with that myself and I’ll go back and forth,” he says, “but I want a painting to work on these multiple levels. In the end, I’m not telling you what the message is — but rather saying that that message needs to be discovered.”

“It is a paradox of nature that while considering the world around us, we are constantly reminded of questions that transcend what we actually see. I can only wonder about the forces that create a particular place as a particular moment, and the serendipity of being there. I paint landscapes as impressions of places and the feelings we associate with that moment. They are expressions, though, of what ultimately can not be understood in a purely narrative sense. The characteristics of my paintings are an emphasis on color and abstract patterns. The two weave around objects from the natural landscape and coalesce as shape and movement influenced by mood, light, and space.”

Artist’s Portfolio →

Gallery Location

501 East Dean Street (Residences at The Little Nell building)

Aspen, CO 81611

Map/Directions →

ARIES
YIN
METAL
RABBIT
December 13, 2013 – January 24, 2014
Reception for the artist, Friday, December 13, 6 – 8 pm

Aries, Yin, Metal, Rabbit features three distinctive bodies of work by Cox: “Vessels” — Cox’s first ceramic creations in many years — is a series of thrown-and-altered porcelain vases; “Hemicycles” is a series of gorgeous, large and extra-large constructed wood-panel pieces in the style that Cox is perhaps best known for; and “Re-Sites” includes a dozen or more smaller, deep-patina beeswax-on-wood-panel works that summon fossils encapsulated in amber.

While Cox is often described as a painter, he prefers to think of himself instead as a constructor — and Aries, Yin, Metal, Rabbit attempts to demonstrate his range of interests and talents in that regard.

“I’m a materials guy. My vocabulary is putty, wax, ceramics and wood,” Cox said. “I’m not really a painter. I’m a constructor — a constructor who loves all these materials.”

The largest of Cox’s “Hemicycles” panels measures almost nine by seven feet, and the new panels bear many of his characteristic touches – in the formal geometric abstraction style — with subtle new variations: arrangements of circles and half-circles, heavily-patinaed paint and putty elements, and all beneath a smooth high-gloss finish.

“In these new pieces the circles have been divided into two parts,” Cox said. “I’m intrigued by two parts, it reminds me of ying and yang, black and white, the duality of life.”

The “Vessels” series represents Cox’s first ceramics work in perhaps more than a decade. “I can’t even remember the last time I showed clay vessels,” he said. “But I have an MFA in ceramics, I’ve taught ceramics at the college level and I’ve never lost my love for clay.”

“I like to see myself as an alchemist, as a person who transforms materials,” he continued. “When I first discovered colored wood putty, I’d never seen it used this way before, and I know that came from my earlier experiences with clay.” He added, “So the overall theme of the show is my transformation with these different materials.”

In the beeswax-on-panel “Re-Site” series, Cox says: “A lot of them have this amber quality, like if you look hard enough you’re going to see a fossil in there. And there is a real talisman kind of quality to them, because many of the embedded objects are actually from an African hunter’s shirt.”

Cox, a native of Los Angeles, attended Claremont Men’s College in California and earned an MFA from the Rhode Island School of Design. He was an assistant professor of art at San Diego State University until 1982, when he resigned in order to pursue making art full-time.
Cox’s work is represented in numerous public and private collections, including the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, the Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art, and the Museum of Fine Arts in Santa Fe, N.M. He is frequently described as one of the valley’s most accomplished contemporary artists.